EPA Announces Shoreline Cities Green Infrastructure Grants in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Ohio

An example of a rain garden in the right-of-way. These rain gardens are instrumental in slowing down and absorbing floodwaters. Photo courtesy of the Cleveland Metroparks.

An example of a rain garden in the right-of-way. These rain gardens are instrumental in slowing down and absorbing floodwaters. Photo courtesy of the Cleveland Metroparks.

Over the last month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been announcing Shoreline Cities Green Infrastructure grants around the Great Lakes. These grants use Great Lakes Restoration Initiative dollars address polluted stormwater runoff using green infrastructure. So far the cities that have received funding include Duluth in Minnesota; Green Bay, Milwaukee, and Racine in Wisconsin; and Cleveland, Lakewood, Lorain, and Toledo in Ohio. 

 

Duluth, Minn. received $250,000 that will go towards green infrastructure for the Lake Superior Zoo, Atlas Industrial Brownfield Park, and Chambers Grove Park. These infrastructure projects are expected to retain about 200,000 gallons of stormwater, while also reducing the amount of polluted stormwater that reaches Lake Superior.

In Wisconsin, Green Bay received $500,000 from the GLRI that will be used to install permeable pavement and rain gardens in Bay Beach Park. These projects are expected to retain about over 280,000 gallons of stormwater. Milwaukee was awarded a $1 million grant from the GLRI that will be used to improve water quality the Kinnickinnic, the Menomonee, and Milwaukee Rivers. The city will install permeable pavement in various places to filter stormwater. Finally, Racine received a $250,000 GLRI grant to construct bioswales and gardens in two public parks with the goal of reducing runoff into Lake Michigan.

 

In Ohio, Cleveland, will benefit from the $500,000 GLRI grant they received. The city will use the funds to install green infrastructure near the West Side Market. Lakewood will use their $107,500 grant to install bioretention planters in Madison park with the goal of reducing polluted runoff by over 400,000 gallons each year. Lorain received $250,000 in GLRI funding to improve how Lakeview Park handles stormwater. Lorain will install a wetland sand filter that will help remove bacteria from stormwater that does reach Lake Erie. Finally, in Toledo, a $500,000 GLRI grant will be used to install rain gardens along Silver Creek and put sand filters and vernal ponds into the city’s Cullen Park. The projects in Toledo will prevent about 645,000 gallons of untreated stormwater from reaching Lake Erie.

This entry was posted in Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.